Unione Internazionale degli Inquilini

Circa IUT

La IUT è un’organizzazione non governativa fondata nel 1926 a Zurigo, Svizzera, allo scopo di tutelare gli interessi degli inquilini. La IUT è un’organizzazione apolitica, che svolge il proprio lavoro su basi democratiche.

La IUT (2008) ta 57 associazioni affiliate in 44 Paesi, di cui 36 europei.

La IUT è consulente ufficiale del Consiglio Economico e Sociale dell’ONU. Il Consiglio della IUT si riunisce due volte l’anno, mentre il congresso si svolge ogni tre anni.

Di seguito sono riportati alcuni degli obiettivi:

  • Cooperazione tra gli inquilini mediante condivisione di informazioni.
  • Tutela del diritto di ogni persona ad una casa adeguata in un ambiente residenziale salubre, ad un affitto equo.
  • Democrazia di residenti/inquilini e diritto di partecipazione.
  • Nessuna discriminazione sessuale, razziale, etnica e religiosa.
  • Sicurezza degli inquilini.
  • Diritto di organizzazione.

Le attività della IUT comprendono:

  • Informazioni su Internet, sito The Global Tenant; www.iut.nu
  • The Global Tenant, Magasine Globale degli Inquilini, quattro volte ogni anno
  • Seminari.
  • Partecipazione ad agenzie dell’ONU tra cui Commissione Economica per l’Europa delle Nazioni Unite, ECE e Centro delle Nazioni Unite per gli Insediamenti Umani, UNCHS. Da gennaio del 2005, NGO membro del Consiglio di Europa, Strasbourg.
  • Partnership con International Federation for Housing and Planning, IFHP, ed Habitat International Coalition, HIC.
  • Partecipazione alla rete dell’UE, Forum Europeo per la Casa, EHF. (European Housing Forum)

La IUT considera la casa come uno dei diritti fondamentali, una questione che quindi deve essere affrontata a livello locale, nazionale ed internazionale. Una casa adeguata è anche garanzia di pace e sicurezza in Europa e nel resto del mondo. La mancanza della casa è una delle principali cause di emarginazione.

La IUT intende inserire le questioni relative alla casa fra i programmi dell’UE. La casa ed il mercato del lavoro sono strettamente correlati e, a livello di UE, devono essere analizzati congiuntamente. La casa deve essere inclusa in una delle commissioni dell’UE. Inoltre occorre adottare misure speciali relativamente ai Paesi in transizione.


Relazioni, collegamenti e pubblicazioni

Are you paying too much for your rent in Italy? June, 2016

Diventano legge le misure del decreto casa, 21 maggio. Il punto del Sicet

Il Governo propone una tassa piatta (flat tax)  del 20% a tutti i proprietari, Sept, 2010

Italy: Milan evicts 86-year-old pensioner who couldn’t pay rent – SICET protests, May 15

Italy: Parliament approves public housing plan, May 20

Italy: Social-housing protest sparks havoc in Rome, Oct. 31

Press release/Disagio abitativo.25 maggio 2012
Federcasa, Cgil, Cisl e Uil incalzano il Governo: “Trovare soluzioni che diano risposte concrete alle famiglie” Nel corso di un incontro a Roma, i sindacati chiedono che i temi dell’abitare tornino ad essere centrali nel dibattito politico. Iniziativa entro il mese di giugno per rispondere al disagio abitativo.

Rapporto sul Mercato Immobiliare Residenziale Europeo, 2011 

Renting a House or Apartment in Italy

Renting in Italy

Sfrattato suicida a Falconara (An): il SICET non lasciamoli soli, rafforzare subito protezione e aiuto perché non succeda mai più, 12 settembre

Svezia, Stoccolma, 78 alloggi di social housing, Giugno, 2012.

Tenant’s Rights in Italy 2016

The Government is proposing a flat tax of 20% to all house/flatowners, by SICET September 2010

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Threshold – Solving housing problems, preventing homelessness
October 26 Threshold, 40 years old, organized a conference in Dublin “Reimaging Ireland's future + housing, wealth and inequality.”
Commenting the event, Threshold’s Chairperson Dr Aideen Hayden said: “Threshold was established at a time when discrimination in terms of access to rented accommodation, illegal evictions and poor living conditions were widespread. Unfortunately, not much has changed in the intervening years. Ireland faces severe challenges in dealing with a homelessness crisis caused by a failed rented sector. Moreover, we now have a whole new “generation rent” whose housing future is very uncertain, unless significant steps are taken to secure more social housing and access to affordable rental and purchase schemes. Without significant changes, many Irish people will live in the rented sector for the rest of their lives, a sector that is not fit for purpose. Much of what is happening in Ireland is replicated elsewhere, falling rates of homeownership and rising rates of renting are a feature of many developed European countries. However, we have much to learn from the successes and failures of our European and international counterparts and I look forward to hearing from our panel of national and international speakers.”
“Our conference is not focused on the housing crisis but on asking questions on how we will live in the future, through examining inequality, opportunity and tenure. We are delighted to bring together such a fantastic range of Irish and international expertise to inform our discussions today.”
Threshold chief executive, John-Mark McCafferty added: “There are solutions to our housing crisis – other similar countries do not face the same extent of crisis that we do. However, political will is key to ensuring that the close to 10,000 homeless people find suitable long-term accommodation, and that tenants have affordable, secure and sustainable accommodation throughout all their life stages.
“A home is not just where you live, it’s a place of sanctuary, offering protection from the stresses and strains of daily living. Government investment in housing needs to meet the needs of the population first and investors second. I am looking forward to learning from the experiences of other countries and the insights of our speakers and panellists, which Ireland can build on in developing our housing policies.”
The morning’s keynote address was given by Professor of Public Policy and Director of The Urban Institute at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Mark Stephens. He questioned if lessons from Scotland’s past can inform and shape future thinking. Commenting, he said: “The Irish Government doesn’t have to look too far for effective solutions to the myriad of problems associated with a housing crisis. For example, the Scottish government has committed to making social rented housing a central part of the housing system by ending the ‘Right to Buy’ and financing a 50,000-unit affordable homes programme. Private tenancies have been reformed to provide much greater security and Scotland has the strongest statutory rights for homeless people in the world.”
President of the International Union of Tenants (IUT), Sven Bergenstråhle, speaking for the first time in Dublin, gave an afternoon keynote address on best practice from our European neighbours. He said: “The market has never met, and will never meet, the needs of low- to middle-income households. Therefore, different kinds of subsidies are needed. Past experiences from across the globe point also to a need for greater regulation in the housing market and the need for a balance of interests between landlords and tenants.”
... See MoreSee Less

2018-10-28  ·  

Threshold – Solving housing problems, preventing homelessness
October 26 Threshold organized Threshold, 40 years old, for 40 years since a conference under the theme “Reimaging Ireland's future + housing, wealth and inequality in Dublin.”
Commenting the event, Threshold’s Chairperson Dr Aideen Hayden said: “Threshold was established at a time when discrimination in terms of access to rented accommodation, illegal evictions and poor living conditions were widespread. Unfortunately, not much has changed in the intervening years. Ireland faces severe challenges in dealing with a homelessness crisis caused by a failed rented sector. Moreover, we now have a whole new “generation rent” whose housing future is very uncertain, unless significant steps are taken to secure more social housing and access to affordable rental and purchase schemes. Without significant changes, many Irish people will live in the rented sector for the rest of their lives, a sector that is not fit for purpose. Much of what is happening in Ireland is replicated elsewhere, falling rates of homeownership and rising rates of renting are a feature of many developed European countries. However, we have much to learn from the successes and failures of our European and international counterparts and I look forward to hearing from our panel of national and international speakers.”
“Our conference today is not focused on the housing crisis but on asking questions on how we will live in the future, through examining inequality, opportunity and tenure. We are delighted to bring together such a fantastic range of Irish and international expertise to inform our discussions today.”
Threshold chief executive, John-Mark McCafferty added: “There are solutions to our housing crisis – other similar countries do not face the same extent of crisis that we do. However, political will is key to ensuring that the close to 10,000 homeless people find suitable long-term accommodation and that tenants have affordable, secure and sustainable accommodation throughout all of their life stages.
“A home is not just where you live, it’s a place of sanctuary, offering protection from the stresses and strains of daily living. Government investment in housing needs to meet the needs of the population first and investors second. I am looking forward to learning from the experiences of other countries and the insights of our speakers and panellists, which Ireland can build on in developing our housing policies.”
This morning’s keynote address was given by Professor of Public Policy and Director of The Urban Institute at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Mark Stephens. He questioned if lessons from Scotland’s past can inform and shape future thinking. Commenting, he said: “The Irish Government doesn’t have to look too far for effective solutions to the myriad of problems associated with a housing crisis. For example, the Scottish government has committed to making social rented housing a central part of the housing system by ending the ‘Right to Buy’ and financing a 50,000-unit affordable homes programme. Private tenancies have been reformed to provide much greater security and Scotland has the strongest statutory rights for homeless people in the world.”
President of the International Union of Tenants (IUT), Sven Bergenstrahle, speaking for the first time in Dublin, gave an afternoon keynote address on best practice from our European neighbours. He said: “The market has never met, and will never meet, the needs of low- to middle-income households, Therefore, different kinds of subsidies are needed. Past experiences from across the globe point to a need for greater regulation in the housing market and the need for a balance of interests between landlords and tenants.”
... See MoreSee Less

2018-10-28  ·  

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